HOOD LAWHEAD PDF

Hood (King Raven Trilogy) [Steve Lawhead] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Presents a reimagining of the tale of Robin Hood in which. Summary: An interesting and entertaining first instalment giving a revisionist twist to the Robin Hood legend. Well written, and full of familiar. For centuries, the legend of Robin Hood and his band of thieves has captivated the Internationally-acclaimed author Stephen R. Lawhead has created a lyrical .

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Hood by Stephen R. Hood King Raven 1 by Stephen R. Now the ,awhead tale takes on new life, fresh meaning, and an unexpected setting. Steeped in Celtic mythology and the political intrigue of medieval Britain, Stephen R. Lawhead’s latest work conjures up an ancient past and holds a mirror to contem Robin Hood The Legend Begins Anew For centuries, the legend of Robin Hood and his band of thieves has captivated the imagination.

Lawhead’s latest work conjures up an ancient past and holds a mirror to contemporary realities. Prepare yourself for an epic tale that dares to shatter everything you thought you knew about Robin Laahead. Hardcoverpages. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Hoodplease sign lawhexd. What’s the level of fantasy in this book?

But no one is throwing hoodd fireballs or anything like that. One of the characters is portrayed as being able to see or predict the future, but very subtle.

Stephanie Male – and his name is Bran. Lists with This Book. Jan 18, Stephen rated it liked it Shelves: Robin Hood and Friar Tuck together hoor again For the most part, I found this version very effective.

Yep, the French have landed in England and they are tossing farm animals and farting in everyone’s general direction. While consolidating his rule in England, William has turned his hungry eyes toward Hoo and has begun confiscating a governmental euphemism for stealing Welsh lands and bestowing them on his most loyal followers.

Yes, I went there and I stand by it.

I think Lawhead straddles this line deftly without losing his balance. All this begs the question I certainly enjoyed it and think the background, the characters and the story were very good. Still, I liked it. I feel a bit stingy because of it, but there you go. View hooe 16 comments. Well that was a letdown. I absolutely hlod Robin Hood, Wales, anything medieval, and Celtic mythology, so this retelling seemed like the best setup ever!!

King Raven Trilogy

Unfortunately it’s just dull the whole way through. I couldn’t even get into the action scenes. There’s just something weird about the writing that feels forced or like even the author couldn’t bring himself to good much.

The basic plot is that Bran ap Brychan is t Well that was a letdown. The basic plot is that Bran ap Brychan is the king’s heir, but has to flee to a forest on the Welsh border when the king and his warband are all killed. The super handsome Bran was late to that massacre because he was busy trying to seduce Marien. He meets up with the typical figures like Gysburne, Tuck, and the outlaws. Bran takes the shape of a giant raven, so rumors start circulating about the phantom King Raven who protects the Cymru and won’t be defeated.

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So the story had potential, but the execution was super bland all around. The end of this book did get a bit more interesting View all 4 comments.

I’m just not feeling this. The story is decent enough and I love the idea of a gritty, realistic, Hoid Robin Hood.

The execution is just falling flat, and there’s too much out there I want to read to continue reading a book I don’t care about. There’s something off about this writing. While I wouldn’t necessarily call it bad, it feels forced. Like the author is making a conscious effort to “dumb down” his narrative to make it YA.

It ends up reading about as flat as a poorly done translation from a foreign language. So yeah, I don’t think this fails because it is YA. I think it fails because the author isn’t writing YA well. I have no idea how his writing is for his “adult” books, but this didn’t give me a lot of incentive to try any. View all 6 comments. Aug 23, Werner rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Fans of action-oriented historical fiction.

Lawhead is one of my favorite authors, so I had a built-in interest in his King Raven trilogy as soon as I heard about it. This first volume didn’t disappoint!

Unlike the author’s Dragon King and Song of Albion fantasy trilogies, this one is a work of historical fiction; like Parke Godwin in Sherwoodhe’s set himself to re-imagine what the actual roots of the Robin Hood legend might have been like, and like the latter he locates Robin in the 11th century, not the 12th.

Lawhead, though, places Lawhead is one of my favorite authors, so I had a built-in interest in his King Raven trilogy as soon as I heard about it. Lawhead, though, places the doughty outlaw later than Godwin, in the reign of William II –and locates him in the Welsh marches, as a Celtic Briton fighting for his land and people in the face of creeping Norman conquest. This, of course, reflects the writer’s well-known fascination with all things Celtic; but as might be expected from his penchant for thorough research, it isn’t without arguable historical justification some of which he sketches in the fascinating “Robin Hood in Wales?

While Hood isn’t a fantasy per se, though, it has its roots in legend and lore, a forest setting that’s certainly a place of mystery and secrets, and as in, for instance, Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter the occasional ambiguous hint of something that might –or might not! Lawhead’s knowledge of Welsh history and folktales is in evidence although the story Angharad tells Bran about his namesake is altered considerably from the known version.

More importantly, his ability to spin an involving story is front and center. This is a story of cruel injustice and, ultimately, of brave and creative response to injustice; but though it has violent action in places not as grisly-gory as in some Lawhead novelsit’s not solely about fighting with swords and bows.

Robin here named Bran doesn’t come to his liberating mission as a full-blown hero like Minerva leaping from the brain of Jove; he’s an older teen in most of the book, a human being with realistic psychological baggage, and he has to grow into his calling.

Watching him do that is as fascinating as the action scenes!

Hood (King Raven, #1) by Stephen R. Lawhead

A lot more could be written favorably about this book; but suffice it to say that it’s a worthy addition to literature’s Robin Hood canon. It also ably sets the stage for the next volume, Scarlet –and now, for me, it’s on to that one!

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View all hod comments. Oct 26, Rebecca McNutt rated it it was amazing Shelves: Hood is an intriguing story, full of action and interesting character development. A more realistic retelling of Robin Hoodit’s steeped in a shockingly brutal moment in history as a young boy tries to find his way through it all.

Aug 25, Matt rated it it was ok. I just got an email that someone liked this ladhead and it took me a moment to even remember that I had read it.

Usually I don’t have a problem remember a book I’ve read, even years later. With this one, however, I cannot even remember anything about the plot. I’m not any sadder for reading this book, but I’m certainly not any more enriched or anything. His historical spin on the Robin Hood legend is well-conceived but poorly executed. It’s got plenty of action and the dialogue isn’t awful, but there was just something missing for me. I didn’t care about the protagonist and I didn’t love or hate anyone else in the story.

It was just one of those books that I had no problem finishing, but when I was done just sort of shrugged, scratched my nose and took it back to the library. Didn’t really make a mark at all. Fairly predictable plot lines, characters that aren’t lawheac but that don’t really evoke any kind of emotional response either way.

If you really really really like Robin Hood then it’s probably something you’ll enjoy at least a little bit, but beyond that I have nothing to say.

Stephen Lawhead’s new trilogy about Robin Hood, the King Raven trilogy, is hod unusual in its portrayal of Robin Hood as a Welsh prince in the time of William II rather than a dispossessed aristocrat during Pawhead the Lionheart’s crusades. Stephen Lawhead includes an epilogue, ‘Robin Hood in Wales’, in which he explains his reasoning. It will seem strange to hoo readers, and perhaps even perverse, to take Robin Hood out of Sherwood Forest and relocate him in Wales; worse still, to remove all Stephen Lawhead’s new trilogy about Robin Hood, the King Raven trilogy, is pretty unusual in its portrayal of Robin Hood as a Welsh prince in the time of William II rather than a dispossessed aristocrat during Richard the Lionheart’s crusades.

It will seem strange to many readers, and perhaps even perverse, to take Robin Hood out of Sherwood Forest and relocate him in Wales; worse still, to remove all trace of Englishness, set his story in the eleventh century, and recast the honourable outlaw as an early British freedom fighter.

My contention is that although in Nottingham, the Robin Hood legends found good soil in which to grow — they must surely have originated elsewhere. As far as I can tell, Lawhead’s hypothesis is reasonable. I kind of wish he’d included a list of sources, maybe referenced some other writers, as I know nothing else about this. It’s kind of appropriate that I read this now: I go to a Welsh university where I’m going to be studying the Robin Hood tradition next semester!